Latest News

Posts Tagged ‘Triathlon Training’

Fuel yourself to triathlon success

Saturday, November 27th, 2010

.

If you’re an endurance athlete reading this, the chances are that right now, you’re used to fuelling your body to meet your increase caloric expenditure with foods such as pasta, bagels, bread, milk, cheese, and pretty much anything that’s calorie dense, and that will help you to maintain a reasonable balance between calories in vs calories out.

.

But, the chances are also that you’re recovery time between workouts is slow, you suffer from a  lack of energy, frequently feel bloated, your guts may feel messy during training, and you frequently seem to hit ‘the wall’ during training and racing. It shouldn’t be like that!

.

As an endurance athlete, whether recreational, age grouper or pro, you will be burning around 1000-3000 calories per day more than mere mortals. But most endurance athletes seem to think that because of this higher demand, that they can eat pretty much what they want in order to satisfy the energy requirements of the body. Too many people end up using their training volume as an excuse to eat a diet high in refined foods when really, training and competing should be a reason for them eating a healthy, well balanced diet.

.

Consuming a diet high in foods such as the aforementioned, as well as things like sweets, biscuits, pastries, cakes, muffins and all those other tasty treats, leads to heightened blood sugar levels. During exercise, the excess glucose can be used as an energy source, but where most endurance athletes continue to consume these foods during their ‘normal’ daily life, it leads to increased free radical damage within the body, inflammation, poor recovery time in between workouts, and an increased potential for insulin resistance.

.

When you add the above to the high training volume, which itself causes inflammation within the soft tissues of the body, this further negatively affects the bodies internal function, and subsequent performance. If the inflammation is chronic, then the athlete will end up with sore joints, fatigue, poor and incomplete recovery, increased incidence of sickness and poor sleep patterns. Studies are also showing that a diet that is high in refined carbs, is strongly linked to an increase in LDL (bad) cholesterol production, which opens you up to a whole new world of problems, such as coronary heart disease, atherosclerosis and strokes.

.

In addition tot he above, many people have food intolerances, most of which are completely un noticed, or ignored. The diet that’s high in calorie dense, nutrient scare foods is one which increased the consumption of common intolerants such as dairy, wheat and gluten. These intolerances often manifest themselves as bloating, constipation, diarrhoea, gas, weakened immune function, and generally feeling like crap. Most people will put these symptoms down to their training volume, when really it’s usually predominantly down to having a less than satisfactory diet.

.

With an exercise regime such as that of a triathlete and endurance athlete, your body is already under a pretty big level of stress, so your diet should be one which support your health, as opposed to one which ends up adding to the internal stresses of training. In a nutshell, nutrition should support your training, rather than simply being a case of ‘calories in vs calories out’.

.

When working on the nutritional program of an endurance athlete, the very first thing that we will do is to find out which foods are causing, or could cause, problems. To do this we will eliminate the common intolerants such as wheat, gluten, dairy, grains, caffeine and alcohol for one month. This means that the athlete will eat a diet that composes of entirely fresh, wholesome foods. Wheat and cereal based carbohydrates will therefore be replaced with foods such as quinoa, amaranth, millet, lentils, chickpeas, sweet potatoes and yams. Healthy fats are consumed through foods such as seeds, nuts, fresh fish, coconut oils and avocado. Lean protein needs are met by many of the above foods, as well as lean meat such as organic beef, lamb, chicken, turkey, pheasant and eggs. Eggs will occasionally however be taken out of the diet also, as it is possible, and common, for people to be intolerant to these. The athlete will consume plenty of fresh fruit, and loads of vegetables also, to ensure the body is receiving a high level of good quality vitamins and minerals.

.

After this initial month, we will gradually and systematically re-introduce certain foods to see whether they have a negative effect on the athletes feeling of wellbeing. If any ill-effects are felt, such as bloating, cramps, fatigue, or digestive problems, we can be pretty safe to say that their body doesn’t want to be eating that food, so we get rid of it for good. If however the body has no negative reaction, we can determine that the body is able to handle that food well, and so can be reintroduced in moderation.

.

The end result is that the athlete will end up at the end of the process knowing what foods are going to be of actual benefit to his/her health and physical and mental performance, and the foods that it is necessary to avoid. This then allows the athlete to complete their training regime in the knowledge that the nutritional strategy is supporting rather than inhibiting their performance. Improved diet leads to improved performance. Many people will often say that sports performance is 50% training and 50% nutrition, but I would totally disagree. It’s 100% nutrition, and 100% training, so train well, cut out the crap, eat fresh, and gain the competitive edge.

.

To your success

.

Andy ;-)

Tags: , , , , , ,
Posted in Training, Triathlon Training | No Comments »

To the MAX and the UNSTOPPABLE TRIATHLETE

Friday, October 1st, 2010

WHO ELSE is ready to take their triathlon and endurance sports training well and truly TO THE MAX?
.

.
So, the last of this years UK triathlons are pretty much all done and out the way, and right now is a great time to take a couple of weeks out, recharge your batteries, and begin to set some goals for next year. How high will you aim?
.
Maybe you want to complete your first ever triathlon
Maybe you’re looking to step up to a middle distance race
Perhaps you’ve decided that 2011 is the year that you, yes YOU are gonna tackle the ultimate challenge, and attempt an Ironman
You may be looking for a high ranking as an age group athlete, or to even win a race outright
You could even be hoping to qualify for Kona or Clearwater
You might be hitting a marathon, maybe London
Or in a moment of madness you may have decided to swim the channel
.
Whatever you’re looking to do in the endurance sports world, To the MAX has your conditioning and programming well and truly covered. Appropriate and correctly delivered strength and conditioning work has a major effect on performance, there’s no doubting that. After all, what athlete out there wouldn’t benefit from being stronger, faster and more powerful over their chosen distance(s)? What athlete out there wouldn’t benefit from having a bulletproof core, massively enhanced proprioception and a body that functions at its peak? And what athlete out there wouldn’t benefit from saving time on the road, the turbo, the treadmill and the pool, giving them more time to rest, rebuild and reap the benefits of their enhanced conditioning? I’ll answer that for you now. There isn’t one.
.
To the MAX will deliver all of the above, by the barrel load, and more. Much more. It is the ultimate in conditioning work for swim, bike, run, and so far as I’m aware there is NOTHING like it anywhere else in the UK. Want to have an insight into WHY strength and conditioning work is so vital for endurance sports? Check out the articles here:
.
Functional strength training for the endurance athlete Part 1: http://www.procisionfitness.com/blog/2010/03/functional-strength-training-for-endurance-athletes-part-1/
Functional strength training for the endurance athlete Part 2: http://www.procisionfitness.com/blog/2010/09/functional-strength-training-for-the-endurance-athlete-part-2/
.
Sounds like something you can’t afford NOT to do right? Here’s a little more info about the program itself: http://www.procisionfitness.com/blog/2010/09/triathlon-specific-conditioning-class/
.
So look, right now I can release PROVISIONAL start dates and times for the program, but these will be confirmed early next week. The program is going to be run in 8 week blocks of sessions. The actual training program will be changing every 4 weeks, so in any block of 8 weeks, you’ll go through 2 training cycles.
.
Here’s how the details look right now:
.
Start date:                   21st October
Session Days:              Thursdays
Session times:             6.30-7.30pm
Location:                      Wey Valley School, Weymouth
Price:                            £45 (8 weeks)
.
In addition to the sessions you’ll complete with me, you’ll have the opportunity to follow one of my full, fool proof, no junk miles, no BS, UNSTOPPABLE programs, that’ll hit all your targets and much more. Would one of these benefit YOU?
.
The UNSTOPPABLE Triathlete: Sprint to Olympic distance
The UNSTOPPABLE Triathlete: Middle to Iron distance
The UNSTOPPABLE Runner: Half to full marathon
.
If I were to tell you that by November, any one of these programs, along with the email and telephone support I’ll be offering you, is going to sell for in excess of £50 per month, I bet you’d think that To the MAX is going to cost an arm and a leg. Well I have great news for you. It’s not. In fact, the UNSTOPPABLE program will not cost YOU a penny extra. There is however a maximum of just 20 spaces on the program, and with the interest I’ve already received, I anticipate that these will fill up fast.
.
All I need from you right now is to reply to this email, letting me know that you’re interested in the program, and as soon as details are finalised, I’ll be able to make the last few arrangements, and let you know what it is you need to do to confirm your place.
.
Over to you . . . . .

.
Andy Sloan BA (Hons), MMA – CSCC
.
Procision Fitness

Dorset’s ONLY guaranteed results personal trainer

T – 07843438173
E – andy@procisionfitness.com
W – www.procisionfitness.com

Tags: , , , , , , ,
Posted in Triathlon Training | No Comments »

Functional Strength Training for the Endurance Athlete: Part 2

Friday, September 17th, 2010

Functional Strength Training for the Endurance Athlete: Part 2

So you’ve now had an insight into the benefits of appropriate and functional strength training for the endurance athlete, and now it’s time to give you an idea on exactly what it is that should/needs to be trained in order to maximize specific functional strength and power output for your sport.

.

It’s first necessary to take a quick look at what is written in training books for the endurance athlete. I’m sat here with my 4 favourite ones, and just recapping on exactly what they recommend in terms of exercises and programming. Now, before I say anything at all, it’s important to mention that I am by no means slating any of these authors, as they are all experts in their chosen fields, have given and continue to give huge amounts of fantasic information to the sport and I respect them all very much for their contribution to the endurance sports world, and my own personal knowledge also. That said, here are my thoughts:

.

What is prevalent in all these books is single joint isolation exercises, fixed path machines, bilateral (2 legged) exercises, a few stability ball and resistance band exercises.

.

What largely isn’t present is multi-planar movement (the body works in 3 planes of motion; side to side, forward/backward, rotating), uni-lateral (single legged) exercises, any emphasis on exercises that work on your opposite shoulder to hip relationship through integrated core training, or any real bodyweight training.

.

The above are a few of the very basic things that MUST be in your strength program to achieve the performance results you are after, yet for some reason are neglected in just about every book out there that covers strength training for the endurance athlete. Here’s why they’re so key:

.

Multi-planar movement

.

As stated, the body works in 3 planes of motion. The frontal plane, which works side to side, the saggital plane, which works forwards and backwards, and the transverse plane, that works rotation. These planes are all prevalent in endurance sports and so must be trained. Running was initially thought of as a purely saggital movement (you’re moving forwards). However, all 3 planes of motion are present. To pinpoint a couple, in addition to the obvious saggital movement, there is the frontal plane movement of the weight shifting from one side to the other, and the transverse movement through the torso as your shoulder and opposite hip link up. Even in cycling there is an element of transverse and frontal plane motion, for instance as you turn corners, and shift your weight side to side to climb a hill respectively.

.

Single legged movement

.

This is an easy one. One of the biggest endurance sports out there is running. How often in a run are both feet firmly planted on the floor? So why should you train for running, with two feet on the floor, or even worse, with your legs strapped into a leg curl or extension machine? It makes no sense. In order to improve running strength, economy and power output, you need to be strong and stable on a single leg. You get a lot of ground reaction forces with running, and it’s important to ensure that your ankle, knee and hip joints are all working efficiently and well enough to cope with the demands without injury. Any exercise you can do on 2 legs or sat down, you can do on 1 (or an equivalent exercise at least). These are a few very basic and general exercises this can be applied to: If you’re doing seated bicep curls, get up on 1 leg and do them. If you’re squatting, do them on one leg. If you’re doing bench press, get up and do it on 1 leg using a band or cable. Now I’m not saying that every exercise needs to be on one leg, it doesn’t, and shouldn’t be. However, it IS important to have an ELEMENT of single legged work in your program. Exercises like single leg reaches are great for improving running mechanics as well as working on hamstring and glute strength, and single legged, single arm band presses will give a great workout for your spinal rotators as well as providing shoulder stability work, and again, looking at that shoulder to hip relationship.

.

Integrated core training

.

Core training and core stability is something that has gotten a lot of emphasis over recent years, and rightly so. Ensuring you have a healthy, strong core is necessary to remain injury free and for top performance in sports. However, many people seem to think that core training is all about doing all your exercises standing on a BOSU or stability ball, laying in a plank position, throwing in a pile of sit ups, and maybe a few hyperextensions on the mat. It’s so much more than this, and half the exercises I see people doing in the gym environment every day for ‘core stability’ are doing precious little of anything.

.

Without going into big detail, your core is pretty much all the muscles from your ribs to your knees, and is the thing that connects your upper to lower body. From the big externally visible muscles to the smaller hidden muscles, all your major muscles attach to the core in one way or another, either directly or indirectly. If the core is weak, then the link between upper and lower body is weak, so your power output will be weak, your movement patterns will be less than efficient, and you stand a bigger risk of injury.

.

Your core affects every big movement you make in endurance sports, from pulling your arm through the water, to spinning your pedals, to running in a straight line, and has big implications on, to name a few, stride length and frequency, pulling power, and out of the saddle hill climbing.

.

In terms of integrating core training, your body doesn’t work in isolation, it works in integration, so train that way. I have nothing against sit-ups, hyperextensions, or any other valid exercise, but it’s about using the right tool for the right job. How is banging a load of sit ups going to help your running? And why would doing biceps curls on a BOSU ball help you run better?

.

Core training needs to focus on a few things such as strengthening the diagonal force production and transfer (exercises such as diagonal chops, single arm-single leg presses/pulls are great for this), opening up the hips to help counteract seated positions (posterior reaches, staggered stance reverse band flys, and ensuring your midsection is able to cope with what you ask it to. If the core is not strong enough, is not stable enough, and is not stiff enough when required, when you go to push it harder in the swim, hammer it up hill on the bike, or quickly slowing yourself down to turn a corner on a run, it’s like you’re shooting a cannon from a canoe. Integrate your core training by ensuring all your exercises require it to be working. Push ups and recline rows rather than fixed machine chest presses and rows, squatting rather than leg pressing, cable chops instead of sit ups, the list goes on.

.

Bodyweight training

.

I won’t spend long on this at all, but for some reason, and I don’t know why, this is often massively neglected. It seems that most peoples perceptions of what is functional and beneficial, involves the use of some bit of kit. BOSU balls, stability balls, dumbbells, benches, barbells, power plates, body blades, balance boards an whatever the hell else is out there. But what ever happened to bodyweight training? It seems as though it’s mostly been lost somewhere along the way. The importance of bodyweight training can be summed up in the answer to this question - What is it you carry around with you in every workout, every practice, every race, all day every day? Your body. So why would you not train your body, with just your body? In order to master your performance in a sport, surely you need to have total control of your body, how it moves, and how it performs. Functional strength training for the endurance athlete must start with bodyweight work, or at least the vast majority of it must be bodyweight based.

.

Importance of knowing your sport

.

One of the key aspects of training for functional strength is making it specific to the environment and demands of your sport, as well as the movements and forces that are present within that sport.

.

Take swimming for example. This of course takes place in water, and so ground reaction forces, gravity and momentum don’t play a big part as they would in other disciplines such as running. We (usually) swim in a prone position, and so the force we generate comes not from the ground, but is largely generated by our core musculature. Every movement comes from the core, as each body part involved in swimming is anchored at the spine and hips, and so core stiffness and strength is a major factor in efficient and powerful swimming. With the swim, you must also realize the rotational forces transferred through the body, with every kick and every arm movement causing your body to rotate in the water. Stability within the shoulder and hip joints is also essential for the swimmer. If these joints are strong and stable, combined with a strong core, incorrect muscle firing and movement patterns will significantly decrease, leading to increased economy and power output and a decreased risk of injury. So if you’re someone who frequently gets shoulder or lower back pain while swimming.

.

I was recently speaking with a runner friend of mine who religiously completes a ‘run specific’ strength training routine that was given to him by a fellow runner, 2-3 times per week, although doesn’t really feel any real benefits from the program. He’s kindly let me have a look at it, and I’ll share it with you now:

.

Bench press: 4 x 6-12

Machine leg press 3 x 10

Machine hamstring curls 3 x 10

Lat pull down 3 x 10-15

Dumbbell ‘arm running’ 3 x 30 seconds

Biceps curls 4 x 6-12

Tricep dips 3 x 6-12

Twisting sit-ups 3 x 20

.

It doesn’t take a genius to see that this isn’t in any way run specific at all. As with most peoples training programs, it follows more of a traditional, ‘bodybuilding’ type workout, and it’s easy to see why he hasn’t been getting the gains he hoped for. After all, what has heavy bench press or curls got to do with running?! What I did for the guy, is completely revamp his workout into a much more run specific session. I’ll explain the exercise selection a little as we go:

.

Bench press is swapped for push ups: The push up is a fantastic full body exercise, and not only does it hit the pecs, triceps and shoulders, but also works on providing core strength during deceleration.

.

Leg press has been changed for a single leg squat: The single leg squat is much more run specific than a heavy leg press. By using this exercise, he is now getting a great workout for not only his quads, glutes and hamstrings, but also for the strength, stability and integrity of the knee, hip and ankle joints, while also causing a much more specific core workout at the same time, as the body stabilises itself on the single leg.

.

Machine hamstring curls swapped for stability ball hip lifts: The position I’ve got him using during the hip lift simulates the point at which the leg is pulling back against the ground to propel the runner forward, and is giving the hamstrings and glutes the specific strength they require to do this effectively, powerfully, and efficiently.

.

Lat pull down swapped for a recline row: The recline row allows him to target his lats, biceps and rear delts, while also helping to open up the hips in order to counteract poor postures, as well as being able play around with various leg and foot positions to increase/alter the core demands of the exercise.

.

Dumbbell arm running replaced with band resisted single leg step ups: Driving your arms forward and backward with some light dumbbells does nothing to improve your endurance running! The exercise I replaced this with provides a beast of a workout through the entire leg, which also providing single leg stability training and some kick ass core work too, while also allowing the runner to work on arm mechanics for running.

.

Bicep curls replaced with dumbbell single leg reach-curl-press: Hitting the beach weights won’t help any endurance runner to get faster or better. SO what I’ve done here is incorporate the curl into a run specific exercise that targets the ankle, knee and hip joints and their surrounding muscles, while also hitting the shoulder-hip relationship, but still alowing him to bang out some curls!

.

Tricep dips has been replaced with a slit stance overhead band triceps extension: The position we adopt here actually stretches the hip flexors and opens up the hips, while also providing some great deceleration training through the core, as well as enabling him to hit some triceps at the same time.

.

Twisting sit ups were replace with a high to low cable chop: The chop is a great way to work on the shoulder-hip relationship, and also provides a great workout for the spinal rotators and stabilisers, much more so than any sit up can ever do.

.

So that’s what we did with his workout. In the 8 weeks it’s been since I changed his program, he has put a poor start to the season behind him and has smashed his previous PB’s in both 5k and 10k races. Is it all to do with the strength training? No. Did it have a good effect? Clearly.

.

I hope that this article has given you some food for thought, and will cause you to think seriously about integrating an appropriate strength training program into your regime. You WILL feel and see the differences, in the way you look, feel, and most importantly, in your race times.

.

Andy ;-)

Tags: , , , , , ,
Posted in Training, Triathlon Training | No Comments »

Triathlon Specific Conditioning Class

Thursday, September 2nd, 2010

.

To the MAX is on it’s way back!

That’s right, you read it correctly, the much talked about To the MAX – Triathlon and Endurance Sports Conditioning sessions are coming back, and this time there’s a BIG twist!

Those of you who attended previous phases of TTM already know the benefits of the type of training I’ll be putting you through. The evening sessions, combined with the winning attitudes from participants, helped to enable several of the group to compete in and complete their first IRONMAN triathlon, several people to complete their very FIRST triathlon, and a pile of people to smash their PB’s. The conditioning also helped me to complete 2 x Ironman races in the space of 5 weeks, both in faster times than last year (the 2nd of this year was the fastest yet!). And the next few months of conditioning are also going to help me complete Ironman events on back to back weekends in 2011 too. Bottom line: IT WORKS. Below the bottom line: It’s going to be EVEN BETTER this time around! Here’s why:


Earlier this year I headed out to Florida to undergo some professional development at the world famous
Institute of Human Performance, which is the facility created and directed by world renowned strength and functional training coach, Juan Carlos Santana. While over there I became one of just 3 people in the whole of the UK to become an IHP certified functional training specialist, but that’s not the really important bit.



The really important bit,
is that while over there, I told JC that I wanted to drop my training volume but still get great results in Ironman. You see, in December I’d had a shoulder operation which put me out for a while, and had left me with just 18 weeks to train. With the shortage of weeks, and the fact that I was working anything from a 45-65 hour week all in, time wasn’t on my side. I told JC that I knew it was possible for us to get me in great condition in no time at all, and that I was sure there’s a better way of training for long distance without having to put in the 5-10,000m in the pool, 200-300 miles per week on a bike, or the 40-80 miles a week running volume that you hear of elite age groupers and pros talking about. We needed to come up with a way to hit my targets, but with approximately 40-50% less volume than I’d completed per week in the previous season, and in 34 weeks less.


So, we sat down, discussed every aspect of my past training, what works, what doesn’t work, and then began to devise a plan. What we came up with was something (so far as we’re aware) that had never before trialed in the triathlon or endurance sports world, and something that broke pretty much every rule of training for long distance. So what was involved? I won’t break down specifics YET, but: My training hours for the 18 weeks were 7-12 per week, including 2-3 x strength and conditioning sessions per week. I swam on average just twice per week. My only long rides were the 4 that I did between 70-83 miles. I did only one long run (this was 15 miles). Compared with the 14-20 hours per week I trained last year, in that 18 week period, I must have SAVED myself maybe 120-150 hours! That’s 5 or 6 days!


Did the training work? Absolutely. Ironman France was faster than IMUK the previous year, and IMUK this year was faster than them both!


So why am I telling YOU this?


Because, through To the MAX, I plan to deliver a full 42 week training program, using the same system that JC and I devised, to help YOU and another 19 people to achieve their triathlon goals, with minimum training, but maximum effect. You may be training for Ironman like myself and a pile of other guys from
Bustinskin Tri club, you may be training for 70.3, or standard distance, maybe sprint or super sprint. You may be a total novice, or possibly an elite age grouper, but one thing that there is no maybe about, is the fact that whatever you want to do, you want to do it well, you want to be injury free, and you want to be able to ENJOY training for it, and completing it. And that’s why I’m telling you this. Whatever distance you’re training for, whatever level you’re competing at, this program WILL work for you. It’s going to give you a total blueprint of exactly what you have to do on each day, and will even be taking you through nutritional strategies for triathlon success. To cap it off, I’ll be delivering the strength and conditioning program to you through the To the MAX sessions (these will be 1-2 evenings per week for one hour). I’m taking literally all the guesswork out of your training, and giving you the chance to spend more time with your family and friends, and just relaxing, and less time wasting time on junk miles in the pool and on the road.


I know it’s not quite the end of this season yet, and that’s why this program will be kicking off in mid October. BUT I wanted to touch base with you right now, to wet your appetite, give you an idea of what’s going on, and let you know that YOU have the chance to be part of something special. Once this program has been completed, and results show that it works for you as well as it worked for me (probably even better as we’re improving it RIGHT NOW), JC and I plan to undertake some sort of a project, either a book or a DVD detailing the new way to train for going long, without ever needing to go long.

That’s it from me for today. If you’re remotely interested or excited by this (and I’m guessing you are seeing as you’ve taken the time to read this loooong email), then please send me an email letting me know. Feel free to include a couple of details about yourself if you like, such as the event you wish to train for, your current level, any significant achievements thus far etc.

.

Over to you . . . .

Tags: , , , , ,
Posted in Triathlon Training | No Comments »

5 weeks into the Ironman project

Tuesday, March 30th, 2010

I’m currently just more than 5 weeks into the Ironman Project, in which I’ve cut my training volume by around 40%, played around with a few things, and am hoping to achieve a time 1 hour less than last years Ironman UK time. I have to say, even I’m a little suprised with just how well it’s all going thus far.

.

In week 3’s testing session, I knocked 5 minutes off a bike: run brick session, with plenty of gas left in the tank. In week 4 I banged out a PB in the pool despite only having done 3 swim training sessions (other than the kick sessions I was doing previously due to shoulder operation). Most recently, at the end of week 5, for a 40 mile bike ride I increased my average speed by 1mp from 2 weeks previously, and a total of 2mph from the same session in week 2, which is more than a 10% increase in speed over 40 miles in just 6 weeks. Run times are also improving well, with average pace over 8 miles increasing by 20 seconds per mile within the last fortnight.

.

As well as all this, the strength and conditioning is having a major impact in terms of injuries and various aches and pains. Staying in the aero position on the bike is much, much more comfortable for prolonged periods, with no ache whatsoever (I’d often get a little lower back ache from time to time before). There’s no knee pain during running (I used to get a little due to overpronation and tight ITB’s), and the shoulder is feeling strong once again.

.

So, all in all, the program is still going extremely well, and I’m very excited about the next couple of months and the lead up firstly to Ironman Nice, and then to Ironman UK 5 weeks later. I’m also excited about releasing the details of the program to you just as soon as I’ve finished the guinea pig side of things. Until then, I thought I’d share just one workout with you, so check out the video, and I’ll write again soon.

.

Stay strong.

.

Andy

Tags: , , , ,
Posted in Triathlon Training, Uncategorized | No Comments »